Reclaimed Barnwood First Official Flag - Long Grove

Reclaimed Barnwood First Official Flag – Long Grove

$215.00

Weathered and pitted with history the reclaimed wood of the the disappearing Midwest barn is the inspiration and the canvas for Marie Roth’s hand painted tributes to Old Glory. Each American flag comes with a short bio of the barn where the wood originated and story of the flag design. From the Betsy Ross to the 50 star, each flag is truly a unique embodiment of history.


Dimensions: 38 ” x 11 7/8 “
Marie’s flags are handcrafted and one-of-a-kind. Call us for the selection immediately available or to ask us about commissioning a custom flag. 

Flag Information:
This becomes our first official flag on June 4, 1777 the result of a Congressional action taken that day.  The Flag Act reads, “Resolved, That the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation”   The design of our flag had been under consideration by members of Congress for six years although little is known about the discussions because most of our Founding Fathers were Free Masons and very secretive; George Washington perhaps most of all. The Secretary of the Congress destroyed his papers shortly before his death.   It is most likely that Francis Hopkinson was the designer of the first flag.  His design reflects both the pragmatism and inspiration that created the thirteen United States.

Barn Information:
This flag is painted on siding from a barn built in Long Grove by William Operman, c. 1867. Mr. Operman was a Swiss immigrant to the area who had originally intended to make his living as a carpenter, the trade to which he had apprenticed in Switzerland.   According to family lore he left Switzerland and was to set sail on a ship to America that went down at sea, all aboard were lost.  For several years his family mourned his loss not knowing that he had, in fact, missed that ship,  signed on as a ship’s carpenter with another vessel and had safely arrived in America. It is believed that his original intention was to travel further west than Illinois but while here he lost his way and stopped at a farmhouse (still existing) to ask directions.  The person who answered the door was from his village in Switzerland and he decided that he had traveled far enough. 

Weight 20 lbs
Dimensions 12 x 12 x 12 in