Reclaimed Barn Wood Betsy Ross Flag

Reclaimed Barn Wood Betsy Ross Flag

$265.00

Weathered and pitted with history the reclaimed wood of the the disappearing Midwest barn is the inspiration and the canvas for Marie Roth’s hand painted tributes to Old Glory. Each American flag comes with a short bio of the barn where the wood originated and story of the flag design. From the Betsy Ross to the 50 star, each flag is truly a unique embodiment of history.


Dimensions: 32″L x 16″H

Marie’s flags are handcrafted and one-of-a-kind. Call us for the selection immediately available or to ask us about commissioning a custom flag. 

 

Flag Information:
The legend of Betsy Ross was first brought to the public by one of her grandsons, William Canby, in 1870, 94 years after Betsy had allegedly met with George Washington and designed the wreath of stars flag.  Numerous historians have conducted numerous searches but none have been able to verify that Betsy Ross designed or sewed the first American flag, or that George Washington ever visited her upholstery shop in Philadelphia. They were known to each other.  Betsy had done some embroidery work for Gen. Washington and they sat in adjacent pews at Christ Church in Philadelphia.   Some historian believes that it could have been she who first suggested the 5 pointed star, mimicking the “molet” (spur wheel) on Gen. Washington’s Coat of Arms.  Minutes of the State Navy Board of Pennsylvania does show a record of an order to Elizabeth Ross to make ship’s colors for Pennsylvania state ships. 

Barn Information:
This flag is painted on siding from a barn built in Wauconda, Illinois c. 1861.  When it was built the barn was used primarily for a small dairy herd and the out-buildings included a creamery and smokehouse.  The farm passed through four owners and became known as the Wagon Wheel Farm.  In 1951 Dick Breedon and his wife Marge bought the property becoming the fifth owners.  They had no intention of farming, however.  Their dream was to open a pick-your-own apple orchard.  “Mrs. B. and I always had an idea that you could bring city folk out to the country–not for corn or soybean or dairy cattle–but for apples.”  The original purchase was 75 acres and the Breedon’s planted 500 trees.   The first apple picking season for the orchard was 1959.

 

Weight 50 lbs
Dimensions 12 x 12 x 12 in